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Legislature honors Adler Aphasia Center
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Legislature honors Adler Aphasia Center

Jill Tekel, chair of the advisory board of the Adler Aphasia Center branch at the Cooperman JCC in West Orange, works with stroke survivor Ralph Magrans in April 2013. 
Jill Tekel, chair of the advisory board of the Adler Aphasia Center branch at the Cooperman JCC in West Orange, works with stroke survivor Ralph Magrans in April 2013. 

The New Jersey Legislature honored the Adler Aphasia Center with a citation noting its “outstanding efforts in the struggle” to help stroke victims regain their speech and writing ability. 

The center, a nonsectarian organization with roots in the state’s Jewish community, has its main offices in Maywood and the Cooperman JCC in West Orange, and other facilities at the Shimon and Sara Birnbaum JCC in Bridgewater and the JCC of Central NJ in Scotch Plains.

It also has a branch at Hadassah College in Jerusalem. 

The organization was founded by Elaine and Myron Adler, a Bergen County couple, after Myron survived a stroke and regained his speaking ability in 1993.

“As the chair of the advisory committee of our satellite facility at the JCC in West Orange, I have the opportunity to see the advances made by our members weekly,” said Jill Tekel of West Orange in an e-mail to NJ Jewish News. “It is an honor and a privilege to work alongside our staff.”

In their proclamation, the legislators noted that “the strength and success of the State of New Jersey and the vitality of our communities depends upon concerned and dedicated organizations exemplified by the Adler Aphasia Center.”

Among key sponsors of the June 25 citation were State Senators Robert Gordon (D-Dist. 38), Tom Kean, Jr. (R-Dist. 21), Loretta Weinberg (D-Dist. 37), Nia Gill (D-Dist. 34), and Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D-Dist. 3). 

Aphasia is an affliction that affects one million people in the United States.

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